Antique Store Find Post #1

There aren’t any card shows around where I live that I know of. I checked out a few yard sales over the summer, no baseball cards were found.  I was able to score a box of baseball cards in sandwich style bags at a local antique store though! Each bag had 50-70 cards in it and there were about 20 or so bags in the box for $20.00. I brought them home and put them in my closet and forgot all about them until the other day. I pulled out a bag and took a look through it.  It was mostly Fleer from mid-eighties through mid-nineties with a few other random sets and years thrown in.  Here are some of my highlights –

 1988 Fleer – San Francisco Giants Sticker1988_fleer_san_francisco_giants_sticker 1988_fleer_san_francisco_giants_sticker_backI remember these stickers from back in the day. Many were used on folders, binders, baseball card boxes when I was younger.

1990 Fleer – Robin Ventura #550

1990_fleer_robin_ventura

Robin Ventura’s first regular issue Fleer card, he had a card in the 1989 Fleer Update set. He spent 10 seasons with the White Sox (1989-98) and batted .274 with 171 home runs and 741 runs batted in.

2000 Fleer Tradition – Corey Lee and Doug Davis Team Prospects #359

2000_fleer_tradition_corey_lee_doug_davis_team_prospects

Reading the back of this card it said Corey Lee made his major league debut on August 24, after making the jump from Double-A. I cannot remember ever seeing him pitch so I did some research on him and according to baseball-reference.com he made his Major League debut on August 24, 1999 for the Texas Rangers. In that game he gave up three earned runs in one inning pitched in a 10-7 loss to the New York Yankees. He was traded to the Chicago White Sox in 2001, and was signed by a few other teams as a free-agent but never played another game in Major League Baseball. The other top prospect on the card fared a little better. Over a 14 year career, Doug played for five teams and compiled a 92-108 win-loss record with a 4.44 earned run average. In 2005, he finished third in the National League with 208 strikeouts.

1989 Fleer Roberto Alomar #299

1989_fleer_roberto_alomar

Roberto Alomar was voted into the Major League Baseball Hall of Fame in 2011. In three seasons with the Padres (1988-90), Alomar had a .283 batting average with 22 home runs and 157 runs batted in.

1991 Fleer Ultra – Dave Winfield #54

1991_fleer_ultra_dave_winfield

Dave Winfield was voted into the Major League Baseball Hall of Fame in 2001. In two seasons with the Angels (1990-91), Winfield had a .268 batting average with 47 home runs and 158 runs batted in.

2007 Ultra – David Ortiz #24

2007_ultra_david_ortiz

David Ortiz is entering his 13th season with the Boston Red Sox in 2015. He is 34 home runs away from joining the 500 HR Club (and getting his card added to my 500 Homerun Club Milestone Collection). Since joining the Red Sox he has averaged 34 home runs a season, which would mean he would join the club late in the 2015 baseball season.

1996 Fleer – Randy Johnson #240

1996_fleer_randy_johnson

Future Hall of Famer, Randy Johnson spent 10 seasons with the Seattle Mariners. He compiled a 130-74 win-loss record with a 3.42 earned run average in his time in Seattle. While playing for the Mariners he was voted to the American League All-Star team five times and won the American League Cy Young Award in 1995.

2005 Fleer Showcase – Pedro Martinez #67

2005_fleer_showcase_pedro_martinez

Pedro Martinez compiled a 117-37 win-loss record with a 2.52 earned run average in his time in Boston. While playing for the Red Sox he was voted to the American League All-Star team four times and won the American League Cy Young Award in 1999 and 2000.

Nothing too spectacular but I enjoyed seeing Robin Ventura, Roberto Alomar, Randy Johnson, and Pedro Martinez, as I collected them when I was younger.

All stats courtesy of www.baseball-reference.com.

Advertisements

Posted on November 19, 2014, in Antique Store Finds and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: